Your B2B Live Chat Lander Sounds Scratchy. Make Her Sing Like A Canary!

Passive or intrusive B2B Live Chat is sub-optimal – B2B Live Chat needs to actively and politely engage the prospect to understand their needs.

In B2B, your sales cycle is commonly longer and more education is required than with B2C products. For low-ticket B2C, the passive implementation of live chat described below is probably preferable (split test it) from both a costs-perspective and a “get out of their way and let ‘em shop” perspective.

If you’re selling something that requires long copy, consider trying to get a live chat representative talking with your prospect before falling back on the whole blathering speech. (For how much copy you need, see  long copy vs short copy for the deciding factors) .

Let’s review the problem: The two sub-optimal Live Chat implementations

Overstock Live Chat Rep1. Passive live chat is the implementation where a button indicates that live chat is available, but it’s up to the prospect to initiate it.

The problem is that you strongly risk the client never clicking, and thus never understanding their exact needs.

It’s like letting a prospect walk through your retail store without greeting them or seeing what they’re shopping for. The risk of failure to find exactly what the client needs is high because they’re not getting assistance from a company representative (aka floor salesperson).

This is the most common implementation, typical of ecommerce and broadly appropriate in those cases.

2. Intrusive live chat is an aggressive implementation that pops up after a few seconds, interrupting the prospect’s experience and annoying them.

This is sometimes compounded by stupid scripts that the live chat software automatically “communicates” to the visitor, which tells people only that you’re automating things. I.E. You don’t care about their needs, but just about your comfort and results.

(Even worse is when the script asks the visitor if they can be contacted by phone by a representative. It’s the commonly seen marketing error of trying to skip steps in the sales funnel, aka asking for sex on the first date.)

The overarching problem in either case is that a maximum number of prospective leads are not going to engage and disclose their concerns / needs.

So your salespeople never get to address those issues and show how your product is right for them.

The net result therefore is a low conversion rate.

The solution is to immediately-on-landing display the live chat in a lightbox, with a title like “Get information on {keyword} from a customer service expert.”

Displaying the box right away avoids interrupting the prospect after they’ve begun to read or navigate.

It also ensures that 100% of people will be offered assistance, maximizing your chances of hearing and answering people’s problems with the site.

In terms of functionality, visitors can close the box if they want. They’re not trapped or forced to use the box or nothing.

Tech-wise, the lightbox with live chat window is overlaid via javascript, but the underlying page can have your search-engine food content meant to rank the page and persuade visitors to buy.

That is your backup chance at conversion if they don’t want human assistance.

Live Chat's Best Possible Implementation For B2B Sales

The SEO & CRO ideal implementation for a Live Chat box: opens right away on landing, in a lightbox overlay.

- Of course, you can split-test the box to maximize participation rates, the above graphic is just an example.

You might test:

a. Adding a human face,

b. A male face vs female,

c. The headline

d. A “have us call you” alternative call to action etc.

(I.e. I’m not trying to say that a grey background for the live chat is the best, or that a certain opacity is best, or orange fonts etc. (Hat tip smashing magazine for the lightbox graphic that I adapted.))

P.S. For people selling a mix of products that requires short copy for some and long copy for the others - If you don’t want to pay for Live Chat reps to support low-ticket purchases, check out Overstock’s clever implementation.

Instead of “All Other,” you could just write – “Not available for other categories, please check out our FAQ (link), Delivery Policy (link), Shipping Rates (link)” etc.

Overstock Live Chat - Only Available For Certain Categories, amongst which visitor must pick (or not use Live Chat).

P.P.S. You could also use lightboxes to maximize conversion rate on SEO lead generation campaigns.

The difficulty with combining SEO and lead generation is that SEO needs internal links, and lead generation needs an absence of internal links (for high conversion). In my book I talk about different more-or-less grayhat ways of achieving it, but this post has made me realize you can do it completely whitehat.

Just make the lightbox:

1. Take up the full size of the browser and

2. Duplicate your normal page’s content without the navigation.

Did you find this post useful? Get a free chapter from my book on advanced SEO. 

 

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